handloom

To share or not to share your own knowledge? – Dressing the loom

First of all, you all know how much I love to share my thoughts and ideas with others. That’s why I’m deeply in love with Instagram. Thanks to social media I’ve found I huge community of super nice (and extremely skilled) people willing to help and share their knowledge.  Every time I am concerned about something, I share a post on Instagram and get some quick-positive response, isn’t that amazing??! The sad part is that not many people are from Italy (indeed none of my Insta-friend is, with very few exceptions). People from the UK, USA, Australia, Japan…but no Italians out there! I find it so hard to connect with Italian weavers; is it because I always write in english? or maybe because we are potential competitors?

I really don’t know but I noticed that Italians are unwilling to share their own ‘secrets’, their knowledge and the know-how.

Remember my last post about Alpacas?

The two breeders, a lovely couple, have been learning to weave in order to use the Alpacas’ wool they produce. The first thing they told me, once I told them I’m a weaver myself, was: “We asked a few weavers for help but everyone is always reluctant to give us advice”. I was ashamed and seriously concerned about that. They just wanted to know some tips on how to dress the loom quickly and how to bind the warp in an easier way…how could you not help someone who is willing to learn to weave? Why do you have to discourage them? I tried to explain them how I set up my table loom alone, just using water bottles to balance the warp. I’m afraid I failed to explain myself so once back in my studio I wrote them an email adding some pics of the process.

Anyway, this is how I bind a warp on my table loom…in a “super professional” way:

I usually divide my warp in 2 sections so that I have the right tension and it’s easier to balance the warp evenly. The warp showed in the pictures was 390 ends (divided in 2 smaller section of 195 threads each). As you can see I use a raddle to make the process run smoothly; actually, the first time I saw a raddle I was in England, I had never used it before but now I couldn’t live without it! (I don’t think it’s a popular tool in Italy but I’d suggest you to use one, it makes things way easier!). My Ikea bookshelf is essential at this stage, it is part of the process – like it was made for the purpose, don’t you think??. So, this is how I make it…what’s your method?

Ps: If you are an Italian weaver/ creative, prove me wrong! Let’s connect!

 

Advertisements